Saturday, August 27, 2016

WHY I'M NO SUPERMUM

A candid outtake during her one year old shoot


Kind readers of this ordinary blog, as well as many generous friends have told me how I'm a supermum to little humblet. With no false humility, I can assure you that I am not. Here's why -


1. The mum of an infant is an infant mum


Let me put it this way, Mya has been a baby for a grand total of one year and just about two weeks. This means to say, I've only been a mum for? Well, a year and two weeks.

A one-year old mum has a lot to learn. Much like a one-year old has much to grow. They are learning to speak, learning to spoon food into their mouths, learning to toddle and so on. Similar to Mya, I'm learning to create a routine, learning to manage the household, learning how to be a mother and the list goes on.

You may say then that a mum who has had three, or perhaps five children might then be a supermum. Well, she could be. Except that, mums of multiples would tell to you that each and every child is so vastly different, that you might as well be starting all over again.

2. Tough enough being a normal mum


If Supermums are those who cook, clean and put their children to bed. Then normal mums are those who struggle through each day with those tasks, simply because, being a mum is really so much more.

Today, I did a little victory dance because Mya slept through an entire wash cycle. And that's better than normal. We try our best to keep the house in order, do the dishes and put up the laundry. But the moment I close the nursery door, the phone rings and there's a work emergency to attend to. There are also those times when she decides to poop right out of the shower, and we have to do it all over again.

Normal is truly difficult enough to attain, much less super. So my 'ideal' each day is to simply enjoy the moments and accept the changes. Finding the strength to laugh over spilt milk (literally) and read the same story for the fifth time, just as animated as I was at the first read.

3. The role of a role model


Most importantly, I am her first and primary role model. And I have no desire for her to grow up under the impression she has to be super all the time. Photo ready, prim and proper, praiseworthy all the time? I don't think so. She can and will have bad hair days, grumpy mornings and sleepless nights. I want my daughter to know it is fine to make mistakes, with the confidence that her mum has made them too. When she falls, and she does this often now that she's learning to walk, I want her to know that I'm not going to pick her up but I'll certainly be there to cheer her on.

The role model for my child is one that seeks to model for her a human being. One that has flaws, one that makes mistakes, but is poised to learn from them.

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Reflecting on our first year together as mother and child has culminated in some of these thoughts. May I even go as far to say, let's not look up to and envy 'supermums' but instead look out for the super that already exists in each and every mum.


What do you love most about your mum?


Blessed,
Amy

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